Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan Talked About Their Personal Artificial Assistance ‘Jarvis’

Artificial Intelligence technology has been around for a couple of years now, but the technology got everyone’s attention recently due to some gripping incidents. Facebook CEO, Mark Zuckerberg always shared a clear opinion about the AI by saying it’s the future of the tech world. His interest in the self-operating system in not restricted to just a belief as Facebook is actively working on

Source: Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan Talked About Their Personal Artificial Assistance ‘Jarvis’

Electronic contact lenses let you view text messages in your eyes

A tech company announced that it is developing electronic contact lenses aimed at improving the vision of the person who uses them and to allow the wearer to view text messages.

The development is a joint venture between the Center of Microsystems Technology (CMST), the company Imec and the Ghent University in Belgium, according to the technology website Tech 2.

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/338748#ixzz2FKR3SrHr

Print me a jet engine

CONFIRMATION as to how seriously some companies are taking additive manufacturing, popularly known as 3D printing, came on November 20th when GE Aviation, part of the world’s biggest manufacturing group, bought a privately owned company called Morris Technologies. This is a small precision-engineering firm employing 130 people in suburban Cincinnati, Ohio. Morris Technologies has invested heavily in 3D printing equipment and will be printing bits for a new range of jet engines.Morris Technologies uses a number of 3D printing machines, all of which work by using a digital description of an object to build it in physical form, layer by layer. Among the 3D printing technologies used by Morris Technologies is laser sintering. This involves spreading a thin layer of metallic powder onto a build platform and then fusing the material with a laser beam. The process is repeated until an object emerges. Laser sintering is capable of producing all kinds of metal parts, including components made from aerospace-grade titanium.

One of the attractions of printing parts is that it saves material. Instead of machining components from solid billets of metal, in which much of it may be cut away, only the material that is needed to shape the part is used. Printed parts can also be made lighter than forged parts, which promises fuel savings.

http://www.economist.com/blogs/schumpeter/2012/11/additive-manufacturing?fsrc=scn/fb/wl/bl/printajetengine

This 93-year-old has a message for us: “A beach body at 90 is no longer a dream”

Charles Eugster may be 93, but he has no less spring in his step than he did as a young man. In this talk from TEDxZurich, he brings us a powerful statistic: 92% of Americans over the age of 65 have one or more chronic diseases. While many clearly cannot be avoided, Eugster points out that inactivity is to blame for many of the diseases those who have lived long lives endure.

 

To see more http://blog.ted.com/2012/12/05/this-93-year-old-has-a-message-for-us-a-beach-body-at-90-is-no-longer-a-dream/

A 3D printer that manufactures new cancer drugs with drag-and-drop DNA

Researchers from Parabon NanoLabs have developed a new drug for combating a lethal brain cancer called glioblastoma multiforme. But what makes this particular drug unique is that it was printed — molecule by molecule — using a DNA self-assembly technique. And even more remarkable is that the DNA was custom designed with a drag-and-drop computer program. The breakthrough will not only drastically reduce the time it takes to both create and test medications, it will also open the door to completely novel drug designs

 

http://io9.com/5966680/a-3d-printer-that-manufactures-new-cancer-drugs-with-drag+and+drop-dna